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  1. The Hands-On Surgical Training in Congenital Heart Surgery (HOST-CHS) program using 3D printed heart models has received positive feedback from attendees. However, improvements were necessary in the simulator ...

    Authors: Brandon Peel, Pascal Voyer-Nguyen, Osami Honjo, Shi-Joon Yoo and Nabil Hussein

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2020 6:12

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  2. Fill density is a critical parameter affecting the functional performance of 3D printed porous constructs in the biomedical and pharmaceutical domain. Numerous studies have reported the impact of fill density ...

    Authors: Prashanth Ravi

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2020 6:10

    Content type: Research

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  3. Fused deposition modeling 3D printing is used in medicine for diverse purposes such as creating patient-specific anatomical models and surgical instruments. For use in the sterile surgical field, it is necessa...

    Authors: Joshua V. Chen, Kara S. Tanaka, Alan B. C. Dang and Alexis Dang

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2020 6:9

    Content type: Research

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  4. 3D printing in the context of medical application can allow for visualization of patient-specific anatomy to facilitate surgical planning and execution. Intra-operative usage of models and guides allows for re...

    Authors: Graham Ka-Hon Shea, Kenneth Lap-Kei Wu, Iris Wai-Sum Li, Man-Fai Leung, Ada Lai-Ping Ko, Lane Tse, Sherby Suet-Ying Pang, Kenny Yat-Hong Kwan, Tak-Man Wong, Frankie Ka-Li Leung and Christian Xinshuo Fang

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2020 6:7

    Content type: Research

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  5. A new concept for robust non-invasive optical activation of motorized hand prostheses by simple and non-contact commands is presented. In addition, a novel approach for aiding hand amputees is shown, outlining...

    Authors: Simon Hazubski, Harald Hoppe and Andreas Otte

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2020 6:6

    Content type: Technical Note

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  6. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in females and frequently requires core needle biopsy (CNB) to guide management. Adequate training resources for CNB suffer tremendous limitations in reu...

    Authors: Arafat Ali, Rifat Wahab, Jimmy Huynh, Nicole Wake and Mary Mahoney

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2020 6:4

    Content type: Research

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  7. An anthropomorphic phantom is a radiologically accurate, tissue realistic model of the human body that can be used for research into innovative imaging and interventional techniques, education simulation and c...

    Authors: Vahid Anwari, Ashley Lai, Ali Ursani, Karina Rego, Behruz Karasfi, Shailaja Sajja and Narinder Paul

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2020 6:3

    Content type: Research

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  8. The structure of the valve leaflets and sinuses are crucial in supporting the proper function of the semilunar valve and ensuring leaflet durability. Therefore, an enhanced understanding of the structural char...

    Authors: Nabil Hussein, Pascal Voyer-Nguyen, Sharon Portnoy, Brandon Peel, Eric Schrauben, Christopher Macgowan and Shi-Joon Yoo

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2020 6:2

    Content type: Research

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  9. To present the application of custom-made 3D-printed subperiosteal implants for fixed prosthetic restoration of the atrophic posterior mandible of elderly patients.

    Authors: Carlo Mangano, Andrea Bianchi, Francesco Guido Mangano, Jessica Dana, Marco Colombo, Ivan Solop and Oleg Admakin

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2020 6:1

    Content type: Research

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  10. Advanced visualization of medical image data in the form of three-dimensional (3D) printing continues to expand in clinical settings and many hospitals have started to adapt 3D technologies to aid in patient c...

    Authors: Nicole Wake, Amy E. Alexander, Andy M. Christensen, Peter C. Liacouras, Maureen Schickel, Todd Pietila and Jane Matsumoto

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:17

    Content type: Technical Note

    Published on:

  11. Modern low-cost 3D printing technologies offer the promise of access to surgical tools in resource scarce areas, however optimal designs for manufacturing have not yet been established. We explore how the opti...

    Authors: Joshua V. Chen, Alexis B. C. Dang, Carlin S. Lee and Alan B. C. Dang

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:16

    Content type: Research

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  12. The design freedom allowed by three-dimensional (3D) printing enables the production of acetabular off-the-shelf cups with complex porous structures. The only studies on these designs are limited to clinical o...

    Authors: Lorenzo Dall’Ava, Harry Hothi, Johann Henckel, Anna Di Laura, Paul Shearing and Alister Hart

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:15

    Content type: Research

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  13. Three-dimensional (3D) scanning and printing for the production of models is an innovative tool that can be used in veterinary anatomy practical classes. Ease of access to this teaching material can be an impo...

    Authors: Daniela de Alcântara Leite dos Reis, Beatriz Laura Rojas Gouveia, José Carlos Rosa Júnior and Antônio Chaves de Assis Neto

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:13

    Content type: Research

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  14. The use of 3D printing of hydrogels as a cell support in bio-printing of cartilage, organs and tissue has attracted much research interest. For cartilage applications, hydrogels as soft materials must show som...

    Authors: Ana Filipa Cristovão, David Sousa, Filipe Silvestre, Inês Ropio, Ana Gaspar, Célia Henriques, Alexandre Velhinho, Ana Catarina Baptista, Miguel Faustino and Isabel Ferreira

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:12

    Content type: Research

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  15. Neurosurgical residents are finding it more difficult to obtain experience as the primary operator in aneurysm surgery. The present study aimed to replicate patient-derived cranial anatomy, pathology and human...

    Authors: Ruth G. Nagassa, Paul G. McMenamin, Justin W. Adams, Michelle R. Quayle and Jeffrey V. Rosenfeld

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:11

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  16. Skin tumors are the most predominant form of cancer in the United States. Radiation therapy, particularly high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, provides an effective form of cancer control when surgery is not po...

    Authors: Jennifer Chmura, Arthur Erdman, Eric Ehler, Jessica Lawrence, Christopher T. Wilke, Brent Rogers and Clara Ferreira

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:10

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  17. Modern dental treatment with standard screw-type implants leave some cases unaddressed in patients with extreme jaw bone resorption. Custom-made subperiosteal dental implant could be an alternative treatment m...

    Authors: Andrejus Surovas

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:9

    Content type: Technical Note

    Published on:

    The Publisher Correction to this article has been published in 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:14

  18. Brachytherapy involves placement of radioactive sources inside or near the tumour. For gynaecological cancer, recent developments, including 3D imaging and image-guided adaptive brachytherapy, have improved tr...

    Authors: Rianne C. Laan, Remi A. Nout, Jenny Dankelman and Nick J. van de Berg

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:8

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  19. Medical 3D printing has brought the manufacturing world closer to the patient’s bedside than ever before. This requires hospitals and their personnel to update their quality assurance program to more appropria...

    Authors: Mohammad Odeh, Dmitry Levin, Jim Inziello, Fluvio Lobo Fenoglietto, Moses Mathur, Joshua Hermsen, Jack Stubbs and Beth Ripley

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:6

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  20. Our long-term goal is to design and manufacture a customized graft with porous scaffold structure for repairing large mandibular defects using topological optimization and 3D printing technology. The purpose o...

    Authors: Jiajie Hu, Joanne H. Wang, Russel Wang, Xiong Bill Yu, Yunfeng Liu and Dale A. Baur

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:5

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  21. Patient-specific 3D models are being used increasingly in medicine for many applications including surgical planning, procedure rehearsal, trainee education, and patient education. To date, experiences on the ...

    Authors: Nicole Wake, Andrew B. Rosenkrantz, Richard Huang, Katalina U. Park, James S. Wysock, Samir S. Taneja, William C. Huang, Daniel K. Sodickson and Hersh Chandarana

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:4

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  22. 3D printing technology has allowed the creation of custom applicators for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, especially for complex anatomy. With conformal therapy comes the need for advanced dosimetric verif...

    Authors: Courtney Oare, Christopher Wilke, Eric Ehler, Damien Mathew, David Sterling and Clara Ferreira

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:3

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  23. Microneedle patches are arrays of tiny needles that painlessly pierce the skin to deliver medication into the body. Biocompatible microneedles are usually fabricated via molding of a master structure. Microfab...

    Authors: Ashley R. Johnson and Adam T. Procopio

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:2

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  24. One of the key steps in generating three-dimensional (3D) printed models in medicine is segmentation of radiologic imaging. The software tools used for segmentation may be automated, semi-automated, or manual ...

    Authors: Elias Kikano, Nils Grosse Hokamp, Leslie Ciancibello, Nikhil Ramaiya, Christos Kosmas and Amit Gupta

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2019 5:1

    Content type: Research

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  25. Selected medical implants and other 3D printed constructs could potentially benefit from the ability to incorporate contrast agents into their structure. The purpose of the present study is to create 3D printe...

    Authors: David H. Ballard, Udayabhanu Jammalamadaka, Karthik Tappa, Jeffery A. Weisman, Christen J. Boyer, Jonathan Steven Alexander and Pamela K. Woodard

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2018 4:13

    Content type: Research

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  26. The purpose was to create a time sequential three-dimensional virtual reality model, also referred to as a four-dimensional model, to explore its possible benefit and clinical applications. We hypothesized tha...

    Authors: Kylie A. Mena, Kevin P. Urbain, Kevin M. Fahey and Matthew T. Bramlet

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2018 4:15

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  27. Three Dimensional (3D) printed models can aid in effective pre-operative planning by defining the geometry of tumor mass, bone loss, and nearby vessels to help determine the most accurate osteotomy site and th...

    Authors: Thipachart Punyaratabandhu, Peter C. Liacouras and Sutipat Pairojboriboon

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2018 4:12

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  28. Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures and 3D bioprinting have recently gained attention based on their multiple advantages over two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, which have less translational potential to rec...

    Authors: Christen J. Boyer, David H. Ballard, Mansoureh Barzegar, J. Winny Yun, Jennifer E. Woerner, Ghali E. Ghali, Moheb Boktor, Yuping Wang and J. Steven Alexander

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2018 4:9

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  29. Medical three-dimensional (3D) printing has expanded dramatically over the past three decades with growth in both facility adoption and the variety of medical applications. Consideration for each step required...

    Authors: Leonid Chepelev, Nicole Wake, Justin Ryan, Waleed Althobaity, Ashish Gupta, Elsa Arribas, Lumarie Santiago, David H Ballard, Kenneth C Wang, William Weadock, Ciprian N Ionita, Dimitrios Mitsouras, Jonathan Morris, Jane Matsumoto, Andy Christensen, Peter Liacouras…

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2018 4:11

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  30. 3D printing is an ideal manufacturing process for creating patient-matched models (anatomical models) for surgical and interventional planning. Cardiac anatomical models have been described in numerous case st...

    Authors: Justin Ryan, Jonathan Plasencia, Randy Richardson, Daniel Velez, John J. Nigro, Stephen Pophal and David Frakes

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2018 4:10

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  31. The two most popular models used in anatomical training for residents, clinicians, or surgeons are cadavers and sawbones. The former is extremely costly and difficult to attain due to cost, ethical implication...

    Authors: John Hao, Raj Nangunoori, Ying Ying Wu, Mabaran Rajaraman, Daniel Cook, Alex Yu, Boyle Cheng and Kenji Shimada

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2018 4:8

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  32. Minimally-invasive spine procedures provide targeted, individualized diagnosis and pain management for patients. Competence in these procedures is acquired through experience and training. We created a 3D prin...

    Authors: Yi Li, Zhixi Li, Simon Ammanuel, Derrick Gillan and Vinil Shah

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2018 4:7

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  33. In the oral and maxillofacial surgery and dentistry fields, the use of three-dimensional (3D) patient-specific organ models is increasing, which has increased the cost of obtaining them. We developed an enviro...

    Authors: Takashi Kamio, Kamichika Hayashi, Takeshi Onda, Takashi Takaki, Takahiko Shibahara, Takashi Yakushiji, Takeo Shibui and Hiroshi Kato

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2018 4:6

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  34. Cranial defects usually occur after trauma, neurosurgical procedures like decompressive craniotomy, tumour resections, infection and congenital defects. The purpose of cranial vault repair is to protect the un...

    Authors: Abel De La Peña, Javier De La Peña-Brambila, Juan Pérez-De La Torre, Miguel Ochoa and Guillermo J. Gallardo

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2018 4:4

    Content type: Case report

    Published on:

  35. Training in medical education depends on the availability of standardized materials that can reliably mimic the human anatomy and physiology. One alternative to using cadavers or animal bodies is to employ pha...

    Authors: Felipe Wilker Grillo, Victor Hugo Souza, Renan Hiroshi Matsuda, Carlo Rondinoni, Theo Zeferino Pavan, Oswaldo Baffa, Helio Rubens Machado and Antonio Adilton Oliveira Carneiro

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2018 4:3

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  36. There is a potential for direct model manufacturing of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) using 3D printing technique for generating flexible semi-transparent prototypes. A patient-specific AAA model was manufact...

    Authors: Michael Chung, Norbert Radacsi, Colin Robert, Edward D. McCarthy, Anthony Callanan, Noel Conlisk, Peter R. Hoskins and Vasileios Koutsos

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2018 4:2

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  37. In this work, we provide specific clinical examples to demonstrate basic practical techniques involved in image segmentation, computer-aided design, and 3D printing. A step-by-step approach using United States...

    Authors: Leonid Chepelev, Carolina Souza, Waleed Althobaity, Olivier Miguel, Satheesh Krishna, Ekin Akyuz, Taryn Hodgdon, Carlos Torres, Nicole Wake, Amy Alexander, Elizabeth George, Anji Tang, Peter Liacouras, Jane Matsumoto, Jonathan Morris, Andy Christensen…

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2017 3:14

    Content type: Technical Note

    Published on:

  38. Alzheimer’s disease prevalence will reach epidemic proportions in coming decades. There is a need for impactful educational materials to help patients, families, medical practitioners, and policy makers unders...

    Authors: Matthew Marks, Amy Alexander, Joseph Matsumoto, Jane Matsumoto, Jonathan Morris, Ronald Petersen, Clifford Jack Jr., Tatsuya Oishi and David Jones

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2017 3:13

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  39. Oral stents have been shown to reduce the deleterious effects of head and neck radiotherapy through the displacement of normal tissues away from the areas of high dose irradiation. While these stents are commo...

    Authors: Christopher T. Wilke, Mohamed Zaid, Caroline Chung, Clifton D. Fuller, Abdallah S. R. Mohamed, Heath Skinner, Jack Phan, G. Brandon Gunn, William H. Morrison, Adam S. Garden, Steven J. Frank, David I. Rosenthal, Mark S. Chambers and Eugene J. Koay

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2017 3:12

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  40. Distal radius fracture is common in the general population. Fracture management includes a plaster cast, splint and synthetic material cast to immobilise the injured arm. Casting complications are common in th...

    Authors: Yan-Jun Chen, Hui Lin, Xiaodong Zhang, Wenhua Huang, Lin Shi and Defeng Wang

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2017 3:11

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  41. Placing a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) is safe and effective for the palliative treatment of malignant gastroduodenal (GD) strictures. SEMS abutment in the duodenal wall is associated with increased f...

    Authors: Guk Bae Kim, Jung-Hoon Park, Ho-Young Song, Namkug Kim, Hyun Kyung Song, Min Tae Kim, Kun Yung Kim, Jiaywei Tsauo, Eun Jung Jun, Do Hoon Kim and Gin Hyug Lee

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2017 3:10

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  42. Most interactions between pathogenic microorganisms and their target host occur on mucosal surfaces of internal organs such as the intestine. In vitro organ culture (IVOC) provides an unique tool for studying ...

    Authors: Matheus O. Costa, Roman Nosach and John C.S. Harding

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2017 3:9

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  43. The prosthetic devices the military uses to restore function and mobility to our wounded warriors are highly advanced, and in many instances not publically available. There is considerable research aimed at th...

    Authors: Peter C. Liacouras, Divya Sahajwalla, Mark D. Beachler, Todd Sleeman, Vincent B. Ho and John P. Lichtenberger III

    Citation: 3D Printing in Medicine 2017 3:8

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

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